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Guide to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 40th anniversary conference videocassette tapes, 2000

Abstract

Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ("Miss Baker") and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 40th anniversary conference videocassette tapes
Creator
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)
Extent
0.4 Linear feet
Repository
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Location
For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Library's online catalog.

Collection Overview

Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ('Miss Baker') and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC. The conference celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick") was one of the primary institutions of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 from student meetings led by Baker and held at Shaw. Some of the original student members were organizers of sit-ins at segregated lunch counters in the southern United States. Its purpose then was to coordinate the use of nonviolent direct action to attack segregation and other forms of racism.

SNCC played a leading role in the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party over the next few years. In the later part of the 1960s, SNCC focused on Black Power, and then fighting against the Vietnam War. In 1969, SNCC officially changed its name to the Student National Coordinating Committee to reflect the broadening of its strategies.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.

Administrative Information

A majority of collections are stored off site and must be requested at least 48 business hours in advance for retrieval. Contact Rubenstein Library staff before visiting. Read More »

warning Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Researchers must register and agree to copyright and privacy laws before using this collection.

In addition, original audiovisual materials are closed to patron use. Use copies are available in the collection.

All or portions of this collection may be housed off-site in Duke University's Library Service Center. The library may require up to 48 hours to retrieve these materials for research use.

Please contact Research Services staff before visiting the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library to use this collection.

warning Use Restrictions

The copyright interests in this collection have not been transferred to Duke University. For more information, consult the copyright section of the Regulations and Procedures of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Contents of the Collection

Audiovisual, 2000 April

Use copies are available for all videotapes. Please contact Rubenstein Research Services staff to arrange viewing.

Tape 1, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0001
Tape 2, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0002
Tape 3, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0003
Tape 4, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0004
Tape 5, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0005
Tape 6, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0006
Tape 7, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0007
Tape 8, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0008
Tape 9, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0009
Tapes 10 and 11, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0010
Tape 12, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0011
Tape 13, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0012
Tape 14, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0013
Workshop, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0014
Wrap up, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0015
4/2000, 2000 April
Original mini-dv backup copy
Box 1
Video-cassette RL10136-MDV-0016

Historical Note

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick") was one of the primary institutions of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 from student meetings led by Baker and held at Shaw. Some of the original student members were organizers of sit-ins at segregated lunch counters in the southern United States. Its purpose then was to coordinate the use of nonviolent direct action to attack segregation and other forms of racism. SNCC played a leading role in the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party over the next few years. In the later part of the 1960s, SNCC focused on Black Power, and then fighting against the Vietnam War. In 1969, SNCC officially changed its name to the Student National Coordinating Committee to reflect the broadening of its strategies.

Subject Headings

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 40th anniversary conference videocassette tapes, 2000, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Processing Information

Processed by Craig Breaden, March 2014.

Accessions described in this finding aid: 2004-0346.