Archival Expeditions introduces Duke graduate students to teaching with digital primary sources. The student partners with a Duke faculty or librarian sponsor to design an undergraduate course assignment or module that incorporates primary source material in a specific class taught by their sponsor. Sponsors are not required, if a student does not have a sponsor one will be assigned based on subject area. Students have the option of drawing on the Rubenstein Library’s Digital Collections or primary source databases available at Duke.

Graduate students will be expected to spend 10 hours per week over 8 weeks consulting with their sponsor, library staff and other experts and researching, developing and testing the module. The students will work with their sponsor to establish the expectations and parameters for the module after being accepted to the program. A module can take a variety of shapes and be adjusted to fit different courses, disciplines, and goals of the sponsor. Each module should be designed to allow for roughly 1 week of time within an existing course or 10 student hours. These hours can be a combination of in-class and out-of-class activities.

Successful applicants will join a cohort of other Archival Expeditions graduate student instructors. They will participate in ‘Teaching with Digital Archives,’ May 17-28 through the Duke Graduate Academy. In addition, they will participate in a brief orientation at the beginning of the program and will meet a few times during the summer to share experiences and lessons learned.  Students will be compensated $1,500 for their work.  The course module will also be made available on the Archival Expeditions website under a CC-BY NC Creative Commons license, allowing other faculty and students to learn from and reuse it.

Eligibility

Any Duke graduate student who has completed 1 academic year at Duke may apply.  Applications will be reviewed by a panel of faculty members and librarians. Please review the Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Librarian Sponsors to be clear about expectations. Applicants are encouraged to review their project proposal with a librarian before submission.

Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Librarian Sponsor

What is the faculty or librarian sponsor’s role?

The sponsor will establish the expectations and parameters for the module with the graduate student and act as a consultant during the design and testing of the module.

What is the time commitment?

The sponsor and student should plan to meet at least once a month, more frequent meetings can be determined by the faculty sponsor and the graduate student.

What is a module?

A module can take a variety of shapes and be adjusted to fit different courses, disciplines, and goals of the faculty sponsor. Each module should be designed to allow for roughly 1 week of time within an existing course or 10 student hours.

If my student needs support finding material or building the module who should they contact?

The primary liaison for the student is the faculty or librarian sponsor, who can communicate their vision for the module.