Upcoming Events

  • Wed, September 26, 2018 — 5:30 PM
    Bostock 127 (The Edge Workshop Room)
    West Campus

    Kick off the new school year with us at our upcoming meeting on Wednesday, September 26th, from 5:30-7pm. We'll be reading selections from award-winning novelist and essayist Roxane Gay's Difficult Women, her debut collection of short fiction. 

    Although we'll plan to discuss "I Will Follow You," "Difficult Women" and "North Country," you should feel free to read as much or as little (we are low-maintenance, after all) of the work as you'd like. 

    We are also featuring a giveaway--the first ten people to RSVP for the meeting will receive a free copy of the book! 

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  • Wed, October 3, 2018 — 1:00 PM
    Bostock 023 Training Room
    West Campus

    Humanists work with various media, content and materials (sources) as part of their research. These sources can be considered data. This workshop will introduce data management practices for humanities researchers to consider and apply throughout the research lifecycle.  Good data management practices pertaining to planning, organization, documentation, storage and backup, sharing, citation, and preservation will be presented through a humanities lens with discipline-based, concrete examples. While general good data management practices are relevant across disciplines, participants working specifically within the humanities are the intended audience for this workshop.

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  • Mon, October 8, 2018 — 10:00 AM
    Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
    West Campus

    This workshop will provide an overview of common options for publishing sound and video on the Web, focusing on the benefits of various platforms, licensing and rights issues, accessibility issues to consider, and methods of integrating multiple media into research publications. Platforms and tools will include Vimeo, YouTube, SoundCloud, and, for presenting materials in an interactive timeline, Sway and Tableau story feature. Participants will be able to match their digital research with appropriate platforms for public dissemination and will realize the strengths, limitations, and legal issues of various platforms.

    Format: This two-hour workshop is meant to promote and engage discussion around students’ specific digital publishing concerns. Consequently, attendance is capped at 15 students, and participants will be asked to share their specific interests and needs ahead of time, to help ensure that presentation examples and discussion points are sufficiently relevant. Sessions will provide numerous examples (projects and tools) to help illustrate key points.

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  • Mon, October 8, 2018 — 1:00 PM
    Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
    West Campus

    Who are the intended users of your digital publication? How can you reach new audiences and keep your existing audiences actively engaged? We'll learn about some of the ways successful projects connect with their users and promote their work to potential audiences. We’ll also consider how to effectively and ethically involve and credit audience involvement in one’s research and do a quick overview of some annotation tools that foster this kind of engagement (e.g., VideoAnt, StoryMap, Genius, Hypothes.is). Participants will leave this session with a solid grounding in the ethical and logistical dimensions of engaging audiences and incorporating audience involvement into their own publication practices.

    Format: This two-hour workshop is meant to promote and engage discussion around students’ specific digital publishing concerns. Consequently, attendance is capped at 15 students, and participants will be asked to share their specific interests and needs ahead of time, to help ensure that presentation examples and discussion points are sufficiently relevant. We will provide numerous examples (projects and tools) to help illustrate key points.

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  • Tue, October 9, 2018 — 10:00 AM
    Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
    West Campus

    This workshop focuses on the technical dimensions of corpus development.  Using an array of printed matter -- from digital facsimiles of incunabula to modern letterpress/offset books -- we will explore the risks and benefits of optical character recognition (OCR); file formatting and naming issues; organization strategies for large corpora; and problems of data cleaning and preparation.  We will also look at some common sources for textual research data, such as Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, and Google Books.  While this session will not examine legal issues in detail, we will discuss some common legal concerns around the use of textual corpora.
     

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  • Tue, October 9, 2018 — 1:00 PM
    Bostock 121 (Murthy Digital Studio)
    West Campus

    Participants in this session will acquire a general understanding of topic modeling, the automated analysis technique often referred to as "text mining."  Topic modeling can refer to a number of different algorithms, which are computationally intensive and mathematically complex. To facilitate a hands-on approach with a focus on process, this workshop uses the open-source MALLET toolkit as a platform for exploring topic modeling with LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation) and will not offer a comparison of algorithms. In addition to topic modeling, this session introduces the concepts of sequence labeling and automated document classification, both of which are also possible with MALLET.   

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Propose an Event

The Workshop Room, Lounge, and Digital Studio may be reserved for events or workshops. See the description of these rooms on the Spaces page and propose an event in the Edge by completing this form

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